How to save money on groceries and make your food shop go further

How to save money on groceries and make your food shop go further

Have you ever gone into a supermarket intending to buy a punnet of eggs and some milk, only to come out with 2 bars of chocolate, some of that new fancy organic shampoo, and a ‘treat yourself’ snack?… Then you freeze mid-exit, a bag full of unnecessary luxuries and think “wait, what was I here to buy again?”.

…If you’ve done this you’re not alone.

Supermarkets are smart, really smart. Each year the industry spends an exorbitant amount of money on advertising, consumer and market research, and shopping data to create strategies that will increase our ‘basket spend’.

That bag full of luxuries you walked out with? Well that’s just proof their strategies work.

I’m not saying supermarkets are evil, but when their main objective is to get as much money out of you as they can it pays to have some tricks up your sleeve to say “stick-em”, keep your pennies and make your grocery shop go further.

Here are my tops 9 tips to save money on groceries and make your food go further.

1. Write a list

  • There’s a reason this is a top tip for saving on groceries, it really does work.
  • Think about it, if you walk into a supermarket without a list you’ll most likely end up buying things that don’t go together or make complete meals. Curry sauce and lasagne sheets? Biscuits and baked beans? Creative perhaps, but also a recipe for food wastage and money poured down the drain.
  • Take a look through your recipe books, your mum’s handed-down family favourites, or create a recipe board on Pinterest, and pick meals you want to make for that week. Have fun, and try new things!
  • Write down your list of ingredients and any necessities you need before you go into the supermarket. And stick to the list.
  • As you walk through the supermarket tick off the items once they’re in your basket, and don’t stray.  
  • An extra way to make sure you stick to your list is to set yourself a maximum time to spend in-store. I set myself a timer and try to aim for 10-15 minutes max. Not only does this mean you save on your shop and only buy what you need, but you save on time too!

2. Plan meals with similar ingredients

  • This trick is a game-changer, by planning meals with the same or similar ingredients it’ll ensure your shop goes further across the week, you save money, and there’s zero food wastage.
  • Pick your key ingredient for the week, such as a large whole chicken and plan meals around this ingredient – Think a roast on Sunday, pie on Tuesday and risotto on Wednesday.  
  • Or you could pick a cuisine like Italian, and buy ingredients from within this cuisine family. Think pasta, risotto, spinach, tomatoes, mozzarella, anchovies, polenta, salami, olives, and fresh herbs…
  • By picking key ‘family’ ingredients that you can use for multiple meals it’ll save you a tonne of money, and channel your inna Nonna within!

3. Don’t buy pre-chopped veggies

  • I get it the onions bring you tears and chopping a pumpkin feels like a 10 minute bootcamp you’d rather not endure. Buying those pre-chopped veggies takes out the hard work, but at a cost.
  • Those pre-chopped veggies might save you the tears and the muscle power, but they’re a lot more expensive in the long run.
  • My advise, 1. Pre soak your onions in water before you chop them to rid the tears, and 2. Invest in a knife sharpener.

4. Buy Own-Label

  • I’ll let you in on a little secret, most of the supermarket own-label products are the exact same products as your favourite branded labels! How do I know this? I work with a lot of big brands in the UK who produce these products for supermarkets.
  • Supermarkets on their own don’t have the factories and infrastructure to produce the tens-of-thousands of own-label products they offer, so they partner with brands to produce these products for them. It’s a win-win for the brand and the supermarket.
  • When you buy brand all you are paying for is the name, the advertising, the and the packaging.
  • So next time you’re in a supermarket, instead of buying the fancy branded yoghurt, rolled oats, tomato sauce, or soup try buying the own-label equivalent. You’ll be surprised at how little (or no) difference there is.

5. Freeze your leftovers

  • When cooking meals, try to make large enough portions so that leftovers can be frozen and reheated for lunches or dinners.
  • Having leftovers in the freezer is a lifesaver for when you’re skint on time. As instead of popping to the takeaway store for burger or supermarket for a ready-meal you can pop in the freezer and pull out something you’ve pre-prepared to eat.
  • Some of my favourite frozen meals are veggie lasagne, moussaka, pie, and meatballs. They often taste better after being reheated too as the flavours have had more time to absorb. Making this one is delicious saving hack!

6. Make it yourself

  • I used to buy everything pre-made… sauces, drinks, cereals, hash browns, guacamole, the list goes on.
  • The truth is there’s so much we can make ourselves that will not only save us money but be far more nutritious than the store-bought version, which often has a tonne of  artificial ingredients and additives in it.
  • The below is a list of things we make at home that are simple and fun to do!
  • Kombucha: All you need is a scoby, some sugar, water and tea
  • Sourdough Bread: Get yourself a starter, look after it and it’ll look after you for life
  • Curry Paste: Homemade curry paste is ten-fold tastier than store-bought
  • Snack bars and energy balls: Pinterest is your friend here, think peanut butter balls, raw date bars, and coconut bliss balls
  • Sauces: Again, homemade pasta sauces are so much tastier and more nutritious
  • Juices: Get yourself a decent juicer and you’re set!
  • Muesli: Grab some of your favourite dried fruits, grains, nuts, seeds, and spices and get creative!
  • I recommend giving these a go and having a look at what other things you can make at home, think beyond food too. What cleaning or beauty products could you make to replace store bought?

7. Shop online

  • I was recently opened up to the world of online grocery shopping, mostly out of necessity as I don’t have a car in the UK, and was often too optimistic with how much I could carry home…which made for some pretty challenging shopping-bag hikes.
  • Online grocery shopping has so many benefits – It saves you time, is convenient, and they often give you freebies with your order. But the best part? It enables you to have more control of your shopping budget and to stick to it.
  • The strategy of writing a list remains, but the thing I love about online grocery shopping is before you reach the ‘check-out’ you can see what your total is.. if you’ve gone over you can review your shop and cut back or buy the cheaper alternative if needed. It would be a bit awkward if you did this in a real store, as I don’t think Billy in the que behind you would appreciate you trecking back for the cheaper feta!
  • My two favourites are Ocado and Amazon Fresh. And thanks to Amazon Fresh they’re offering a free trial to new customers! Click here to find out more.

8. Don’t go shopping hungry!

  • A simple trick, but one that’ll set you up for success is to never shop on an empty stomach.
  • If you shop on an empty stomach 2 things will happen, 1. you’ll fill your trolly with foods you don’t need and 2. you’ll choose more high-calorie foods as your body is craving energy.
  • To avoid this, try shopping just after you’ve eaten or keep a snack in your bag to avoid feeling peckish.

9. Eat more plant-based meals

  • Eating a more plant-based diet is a great way to save on your weekly shop, by replacing often expensive meat ingredients with cheaper vegetarian alternatives.
  • Pick a couple of meals a week that are vegetarian and get creative – play with colour, new types of vegetables and experiment!
  • Some of my favourite meals are vegetarian (and i’m a meat eater). I love slow-roasted cauliflower with polenta, spinach and feta stuffed pasta shells, vegetarian chilli, and kale and lemon pasta.
  • I’m not saying you have to make every meal you eat plant based, but by replacing 1 or 2 typical meat dishes with the vegetarian alternative you’ll save on meat and get more variety in your diet too.
  • For some plant-based inspiration, check out my Pinterest board here full of recipes i’ve tried and love!

I hope you’ve enjoyed this post and have taken away some tips and tricks to save money on your own grocery shop and to make your food shop go further. Now, time to write that list! (and stick to it).

THE LADDER GIRL

7 Steps for styling a room on a minimal budget

7 Steps for styling a room on a minimal budget

Ever since I can remember i’ve had a love affair with interior design, which to a large extent I have my parents to thank for (thanks guys).

As a kid, they’d take me along on these epic DIY adventures – We’d go to paint shops, tile shops, plant nurseries, garden shows, furniture stores, building supply stores, kitchen expos, the list goes on. Basically, if it was DIY related in any shape or form we’d be there!

I’d find myself walking through the isles of these stores, imagining my home growing up, what it would look like, what it would feel like. I got so excited by what could be, I got hooked.

This early obsession wasn’t without it’s troubles however..

There was the time I dug up my friend’s mum’s perfectly good garden and ‘redecorated it’, the time I lost a friend to boredom as I played ‘changing rooms’ and spent the day tidying her room, or the time my 6-year-old self stole an ornament from an antique store because I thought it would look great in my bright purple bedroom… thankfully overtime i’ve learnt to hold myself back, well just.

Roll the clock forward to 2017, and I land in Europe. I’m moving around, going from Workaway to Housesit, to Airbnb and i’m missing that itch – the itch to make something, dress a room, and be in something I helped create.

So to help with the itch, instead of being my 6-year-old self and gunning ahead I asked the owners of these homes I was staying in “can I decorate one room in your house using the items you have?”, not expecting many people to abide, surprisingly they did!

A lot of these homes were beautiful but they lacked a little aesthetic attention, which I knew I could give them with a little time and freedom.

So off I went, digging into cupboards, attics, drawers, rearranging, moving and organising. The results I was pleasantly surprised with!

Above are some examples of spaces I decorated during this time, mostly with items either found in the homes themselves or that I made. It really goes to show it doesn’t take a lot of money to create something beautiful. To see more of the before & afters you can view on my Instagram here.

Taking learnings from my own experiences and to help you with your own interior adventures, here are my 7 steps for styling a space on a minimal budget:

1. Pick a room:

  • Pick one room in your house that you’d like to redecorate.
  • Take ‘before’ photos (Something I wish I’d done more of to demonstrate progress)
  • Now clear it out. Take items away and strip it back to its bare bones. You don’t have to remove all items (i.e. larger items like a couch or a bed) but removing smaller items will help to give you a neutral space.
  • Now that you’ve done this step, take a breath and sit in the space, give yourself a chance to connect with it again.
  • Move on to step number 2.

2. Define your vision for the space:

  • While you’re in the room get a pen and write down your answers to these questions:
  • What does the room feel like now, and why?
  • Why do you want to change it?
  • What do you want the room to feel like?
  • What will it be used for?
  • What style do you like? (You can use a Pinterest board to help with this – If you’re into a bit of boho style, here is an example of my own Pinterest vision board.

3. Write a list:

  • Review your vision for the room and channel this into a list of things you’d like to have in your room, such as a shelf for books, a desk for writing, or a cosy nook to read in.
  • As you’re writing your list think what things can you utilise that you already own? (point 4 will help with this).
  • Remember keep it simple, you don’t need 15 cushions or 20 candles and you can always build on it later.

4. Utilise what you have:

  • Now that you have a clear space, a vision, and a list of the things you’d like it’s time to refine your list.
  • Review everything on your list and have a look around your home to see if there’s anything you already own that you can utilise, instead of buying new.
  • These are the cushions, throws, candles, frames, lamps, books and artwork that you’ve placed into drawers, behind the couch and in the spare wardrobes over the years.
  • Can these be repurposed? Can these complement the look you’re going for?
  • You’d be amazed at how an old item can look completely new in a new space, or reinvigorated with a coat of paint.

5. Set a budget:

  • Now that you have a list, it’s time to create a budget.
  • For each item on your list put this into a spreadsheet, and give it an allocated amount. Doing this will give you an overall estimated cost, which you can refine if you find those 10 candles mean you’re going over your budget.
  • Think carefully about your budget, how much can you realistically afford? And If you do plan on buying any big-ticket items on credit, set yourself up a payment plan to make sure you can realistically pay it off before you swipe your card.
  • Have this number finalised before you go any further.  

6. Do your research:

  • For bigger-ticket items like electricals and furniture you want to do your research
  • Have a look online to see what’s out there, identify the products you like the look of and  take a look at the reviews, who’s selling it and at what price.
  • Update your budget for these line-items once you know the price, and you know where you’re going to get them from.
  • For more artful objects like paintings, candles, antiques, frames etc have a think about the stores you like, and check-in with your vision board  to ensure they align to the look you’re going for.

6. Go shopping:

  • Now that you have your budget and you know what items you’re going to buy, it’s time to go shop!
  • Big ticket items should be the first on your list, and more artful objects can be discovered as you go.
  • Second-hand artful objects can be great finds! Check out your local second-hand stores, or online stores like Ebay, Gumtree and Trademe.
  • For DIY supplies like paint, wood, and fabrics check out your local supply store and don’t be afraid to ask for a discount. 9 times out of 10 they’ll be more than happy to make you a discounted offer.
  • Be patient. You may want to buy everything all at once, but by having this mindset you’ll likely make rushed decisions, buy more than you can afford, and items you don’t love. Take it slow.

7. The fun part, putting it all together!

  • Now that you have your items, it’s time for the fun part.
  • Start with the big items – the furniture, the rugs, the shelves etc, and set up the room the way you want it to be.
  • Now have some fun, lay out all the smaller items in a space nearby and have a play. Dress the couch, set up the shelf, take photos, and experiment.
  • Refer back to your vision board, and have fun!
  • It’ll be trial and error but it’s all part of the experience, when you’re finished you’ll have a beautiful space to enjoy.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this post, and have found some useful tips to decorate your own space on a minimal budget.

THE LADDER GIRL

Intentional spending doesn’t mean depriving yourself of the things you love

Intentional spending doesn’t mean depriving yourself of the things you love

Last week I wrote this post, which talks about my own journey in becoming more intentional with my spending and buying less ‘things’.

But what I want to focus on today is how I go about bringing new things into my life, the principles I use when buying things, and how you too can apply these principles to ensure what ‘things’ you spend your money on are adding value to your life.

What do I mean by ‘things’?

I’m not talking about the kinds of things that at a human level, we need. I’m talking about the kinds of things that bring colour into your world, that light it up, and that make it a unique place, a place suited to you!

You might get your colour from..

A beautiful painting, classic leather jacket, a new novel, old-school record, paint brushes, plants, headphones, beautiful crockery, a guitar, bike, antique chair, camera, even someone else’s junk… the list of these ‘things’ is truly endless.

These ‘things’ are important.

Things help us express who we are, to be creative, learn, grow and enjoy life. A world without things is possible, sure, but damn it’d take the rainbow away.

So, how you can have these ‘things’ and still be intentional with your money?

There’s a common misconception that if you’re a frugal person then you’re cheap, you live without nice experiences or nice things and i’m here to tell you that’s simply not true…

You can have these things, if you have focus.

The above image captures the ‘things’ that I bought into my life over the past year. These are things that added value to my life, that were thought about and that I treasure. I applied a series of principles to my thinking to ensure there’s no throwaway fast-fashion trends, no impulses, no things gathering up dust in the drawer, and nothing gone to waste – And that to me is so important.

To help give you focus to be intentional with what ‘things’ you bring into your life, here are my top 4 tips:

1. Know your style:

  • It’s important to know what your personal style is, what you like and don’t like, as by doing so you’ll have a set of criteria to measure against when deciding on what new items to bring into your wardrobe or home.
  • To help you define your style this post has some helpful tips and tricks, or you could use a platform like Pinterest to create boards for different areas such as interiors, clothing, gardens, makeup etc, and pin what you like to give you an overview of your style across these areas.
  • By having clarity on your own personal style, instead of going into a store and seeing thousands of items and trends and buying something that you may not truly like, you’ll be able to focus on the items that align to your own personal style and make better purchasing decisions.

2. Quality over quantity:

  • When buying a new item, it’s better to lean towards the cheaper option right? Well not quite.
  • Sure, in the short-term you’ll have the item and had paid less for it, it’s a win-win, until that item wears out and you’re having to replace it a few months later.
  • By buying an item because it’s cheaper, it’s not being smart with your money, yourself, or the environment, and to help get the point across let me pull out 2 coats…
  • Let’s say you buy the first coat for £25, you use it all through Winter and at the end of the Season it starts to lose its shape and pull. You wore it a total of 40 times at 63p per wear and that’s the end of its life. Next Winter you’ll start again with a new £25 coat, and so on.
  • Now let’s say you buy the second coat for £100, you use it all through Winter and at the end of the Season it’s still standing strong, so you use it the next Winter, and the next, and so on. Over 4 Winters at 40 wears per season, that’s 160 wears and 63p per wear.
  • Now, you might think it’s the same cost-per-wear so there’s no difference between the two coats. But the coat that cost you £100 is delivering far more than just cost-per-wear. It’s made of a good quality fabric that is sustainably sourced, is a brand you love, that pays its employees a fair wage, fits you well and there’s one of them across 4 seasons.
  • Whenever you can, invest in an item, it’ll last you longer and you’ll get so much more than just the item out of it!

3. Know what brands and stores you love (and stick to them):

  • Much like knowing your style helps you to narrow your focus when making new purchases, so does knowing what brands and stores you love.
  • Make a list of the brands and stores you really love and buy 80% of the time within these. I keep a list on Google Docs and add to it each time I come across a new brand or store I love.
  • By doing this you’ll start to collate your own personal ‘mall’, and avoid going into stores that don’t align to your values or style.
  • It might sound simple, but it’ll save you a tone of time and almost always ensure what you buy you’ll love.

4. Give it time:

  • See an item you love and want it now? As much as you might want to buy it then and there, walk away (close the window if online) and give it 48 hours. If you still find in 48 hours you’re thinking about that item, if you can afford it and it fits within your budget allowance then buy it.
  • Most of the time however you’ll find after that period you won’t have it on your mind, which means you didn’t love it as much as you thought you did, and you can put your money into something else that you will.
  • Time is important, it gives us clarity and reduces those impulse and in-the-moment purchases we so often end up regretting, use it to your advantage.

I hope you find value in these 4 principles, and that they help you to buy more intentionally and to bring things into your life that you truly love. Remember being intentional and frugal with your money doesn’t mean restricting yourself of the things you love, but it gives you focus to bring in only the things that you truly do (and less of the stuff that you unintentionally don’t).

THE LADDER GIRL

Why I stopped mindlessly shopping and own less things

Why I stopped mindlessly shopping and own less things

I used to love to shop, and I mean shop! I’m talking about the kind of shopping where there’s no intention, no list, no vision other than to mindlessly wander around a mall spending. It was about that instant gratification of having new stuff, things, this-and-that to fill my home and for a brief moment, comfort me.

A new cushion for the couch (already overdressed with an array of textures and colours), or that beige Zara top, a colour I had never worn well with a skin tone as pale as an uncooked chicken (thankfully aided by Bondi Sands when Summer rolls around).

What I was doing wasn’t healthy, not for myself, my partner, my bank account or my mental health. I was buying things without a thought, and in return, they were giving me nothing back, and neither was I.

This needed to stop.

It wasn’t overnight that my habits changed – like many things it took time, many conversations, sifting through my things, analysing my spending, looking at photographs of myself. Who was I? What did I value? Where did I want to go? All these ‘things’ were a result of me not knowing these answers.

I needed to define my ‘why’.

Seeking change and a challenge, my partner and I decided to do what many Kiwi’s do in their 20’s and move to the UK. Why? Because we wanted to become more resilient, more confident, and to experience new cultures, people, and challenges that Auckland at the time didn’t offer us.

The change.

To get there we made many changes, which forced us to be more intentional – no longer could I walk through a mall mindlessly spending. The cushions and beige top needed to go.

We moved into a tiny house (7×3 metres) to save on rent, which meant downsizing – It meant researching and discovering new processes and ways-of-living I had never heard about before, all to get us to our goals and to minimize what we had…

I discovered these movements:

  • The Tiny House Movement
  • Minimalism
  • Capsule Wardrobes
  • The Fire Community
  • House Sitting
  • WWOOF

These new learnings aided and pushed me forward. Yes, they helped us save to go to the UK, and they stopped me going into malls, buying without intention and owning things for owning-things-sake. But they also taught me the beauty of less, and to value more what we so often take for granted. My friends, family, education, and opportunities – these are the things that gave back to me and in return, I can give back to.

Owning less will give you so much more.

Owning less is not about depriving yourself, it’s about being more mindful with the things you have and the things you buy.

Next time you go shopping, go with a plan, think what do I need? What do I like? What brings me joy? Does this purchase align with my goals? And if you keep this in mind I promise you there will never be a mall visit without intention or a rogue beige top finding its way into your closet.

THE LADDER GIRL

How to create a Capsule Wardrobe

How to create a Capsule Wardrobe

I remember the first time I heard about a Capsule Wardrobe, I was sifting through my clothing at my parent’s place deciding what to take with me to London and what to leave behind. The task seemed quite monumental, piles and piles of multicoloured, textured, and patterned fabrics splayed out across the bed – all needing a decision and destination to go.

To help me with my clothing conundrum I decided to hit up Dr Google, and that’s where I found it – It came in capsule form (quite fitting!), and once taken all items are then laid out before you into a beautifully curated wardrobe… I was sold.

What is a Capsule Wardrobe?

A capsule wardrobe is quite simply:

  • A wardrobe containing fewer items (commonly 35 or less)
  • A wardrobe filled with items you love and enjoy
  • A wardrobe with items that are versatile and interchangeable

The Rules – 35 items or less including:

  • Pants
  • Skirts
  • Dresses
  • Tops
  • Jumpers
  • Jackets
  • Shoes
  • This does not include underwear, swimsuits, workout gear, or accessories (but that doesn’t mean you should have 35 pairs of swimsuits)
  • You shop for things you need at the beginning of each season 
  • New items you incorporate into your Capsule Wardrobe should be of high quality and be invested in, so they last you from season-to-season and more importantly feel good on you, are made from a fabric you like, and that you’ll love to wear!

Why should you try a Capsule Wardrobe?

A Capsule Wardrobe gives you a wardrobe that is well put together, shows off your own individual style, takes up less room, is more intentional, and provides you with a curated palate of items that all go well together – meaning less hassle and decision making in the morning when deciding what to wear.

How do you create one?

By following this 4-step process:

1. Pull everything out:

  • It’s time to get all Marie Kondo on it!
  • Put everything into one pile in a room
  • As you pull out each individual item determine whether it’s an item you love vs an item you don’t or are unsure about.

2. Write it down:

  • Write down what you love or don’t love about these items
  • Is it the material, the colour, the fit, or the pattern?
  • For items you don’t love or unsure about, write why – Why haven’t you worn it? How does it make you feel when you put it on?
  • Writing it down will give you a picture of your own personal style. For me, I noticed I loved stripes, white and black, and high neck collars. I also realised I didn’t like pastel colours as they made me look pale, so it made step 3 a whole lot easier.

3. Sort your clothing into 3 groups:

Keep: Items you love

Maybe: Items that you’re unsure about. Interrogate this category, truly delve into why you’re unsure about it and be intentional. Do you really need that studded denim jacket? Is it versatile? Will it go with items you love?

Donate or Sell:Items off to a new home for someone else to love. But a reminder at this point, if you do end up with more than 35 items in your wardrobe that’s ok, the number is not the point. The point is learning to be more intentional.

4. Identify what you need:

Before you hit the shops ask yourself these questions to help you identify what you need and to be more intentional with your clothing spending…

  • What do you spend your time doing? i.e. are you outdoors a lot, do you go to a lot of corporate events?  
  • What are some key design elements you love? Look back at your list, do you love cotton fabrics, stripes, or are you a neutrals girl?
  • What brands do you love?
  • Go shopping: remember your why, be thoughtful and invest.

By following these principles you’ll develop skills to become more intentional with your clothing and to build your own unique and beautiful Capsule Wardrobe. That being said a Capsule Wardrobe is not a magic pill, it takes time and commitment – I still make the odd purchase I’m later regretting and posting on eBay, but what I do have now is a more intentional approach to clothing, a wardrobe that I’ve invested in, is minimal, goes well together, and that feels me – and that’s something that’s worth committing to.

THE LADDER GIRL

5 Podcasts for when you need a little life boost

5 Podcasts for when you need a little life boost

I have to admit I’m a bit slow onto the Podcast scene. Friends had been raving about their powers for a long time – to lift them up, get them through the daily grind, out of a slippery slope, and inspire change. But I just didn’t listen.

Being a purest (Aka a little stubborn at times) my listening portal of choice, Spotify, was used for music and music only. But after hearing my friends’ stories of how Podcasts have helped inspire and motivate them, I decided it was time to extend my Spotify horizons into more than just Tracy Chapman and Springsteen on repeat.

The first Podcast I was recommended to listen to was ‘The Minimalists’, by Joshua Fields Milburn & Ryan Nicodemus. It’s about two men who left their high-paying corporate jobs to discover more meaningful lives – Their ethos ‘living more with less’ is the centre-point where a broad range of topics derive from, from how to let go, live more intentionally, and really value the relationships in your life.

With every episode of The Minimalists, I found that these little life-nuggets were planted into my brain – I was hooked on this new world, a world I couldn’t imagine I was once too closed-minded to open.

Over the past year, I’ve developed a library of favourite Podcast pals to sit alongside Ryan and Josh- they’re like little life coaches and kick-starters to help you with whatever life may throw at you.

Here are my top 5 podcasts…For when you need a little life boost.

1. UNFUCK YOUR BRAIN – By Kara Loewetheil

When your brain needs a little de-hazing, life-coaching, feminist confidence and kick-ass motivation.

2. THE MINIMALISTS – By Joshua Fields Milburn & Ryan Nicodemus

You’ll realise minimalism isn’t just about throwing your stuff out when you listen to these guys. They’re also the masters of the Documentary ‘Minimalism a Documentary about the Important Things’, which thanks to Amazon you can watch free with this 30-day-free trial.

3. HAPPY PLACE – By Fearne Cotton

Fearne gets up close and personal with some big celebrity names. Gripping, sad, happy and refreshing, it makes you realise we’re all human, we all make mistakes… we all feel feelings.

4. THE GROUND UP SHOW – By Matt D’avella

Listen to Matt when you need some straight up direction, a slap in the face, perseverance, and advice on how to turn your passions into a career.

5. BIGGER POCKETS MONEY PODCAST – By Mindy Jensen & Scott Trench

Mindy and Scott tap into the world of personal finance in a human and relatable way. Their interviews with financial experts and stories from people of all walks of life are refreshing and informative. I’ve learnt a tonne from these guys – a good finance booster to keep you on track.