The things I no longer buy to simplify my life

The things I no longer buy to simplify my life

Lately I seem to be focusing a lot on ‘things’. Reflecting on what they once meant to me, and how I clung onto these things as if I truly needed them to be better – A better person, more attractive, happier, more intelligent, more organised, entertained….you get the drift.

The reality is there’s not much in the world we actually need. We survived the caveman years living off what we could muster, and now turn the clock forward to 2019 and we’re ‘surviving’ off overindulgence/over everything…more, more, more!

We think we need the grams, the likes, the wiz-fix creams, trendy gadgets, and the latest and greatest. We don’t, we can live a simpler life and be happy, even happier.

I’ll admit, simplifying your life and the ‘things’ you let in isn’t easy, it takes time to retune your brain to turn these ‘needs’ off. It takes a plan and constant checking-in with yourself, but what you get back in return for sticking to it is more time, money, happiness and a chance to breathe!

After going through my own journey of simplifying my life I know longer need these things I once clung onto for ‘dear betterment’.

So here goes, below is a list of things I no longer buy to simplify my life:

Food & Drink:

  • Frozen ready-meals
  • Pre-prepared vegetables
  • Bottled water
  • Health bars
  • Energy drinks
  • ‘Trendy’ foods
  • Takeaways (Except the odd late-night Kebab shop visit)

Clothing & Accessories:

  • Fast-fashion
  • Anything ‘on trend’
  • More than enough socks
  • Costume clothing and jewellery
  • ‘Going out dresses’
  • Multiple handbags and purses

Beauty:

  • Sprays for this, that, and the other issue I didn’t realise I had?
  • Highlighter
  • Coloured eyeshadow (no one wants to see me with purple lids)
  • Body wash
  • At home hair dyes
  • Eye cream (I have one good quality moisturiser)
  • Nail polish
  • Makeup remover

Household & Other:

  • Room spray
  • Fabric softener
  • New technology (quality second-hand is just as good)
  • Subscription upgrades
  • Magazines

Want to save more? 4 steps to define your ‘why’

Want to save more? 4 steps to define your ‘why’

Let me take you on a little trip to Dalston.

Last weekend I met up with some friends at a newly opened café in Dalston. It’s the kind of cafe you’d expect in Dalston – so underground it’s not even signposted, a gig-venue come café come art-gallery, with a menu hosting ‘<insert hipster café name> fruitcakes’, which really just means blueberry pancakes. All the complex frills required to claim its place in the Dalston Directory of Hipster Approved Cafés.  

Now to the setting. All accounted and seated we began our pre-coffee ramblings – And in typical Antipodean fashion there’s no time for niceties, we’re straight into the deep and meaningfuls, quick.

We discussed an array of things (some things my pre-coffee self just couldn’t compute) – I’m not one for Brexit in the morning, but one thing that did spark up my brain was the subject of savings (my geekish self rejoiced).  

By fruitcakes-time we all collectively agreed we needed to get better at savings, but when asked why? No one had a clear answer. “It’s something we should be doing” seemed to be the general consensus.

Within this response lied the problem, you see by not knowing our ‘why’, we’d already set ourselves up to fail.

Why the Why?

Savings in itself is pointless if you don’t know why you’re saving in the first place. It’s like driving along a highway without an end destination in mind. Do this and you’ll very quickly find yourself off-course, without gas, and allured by other the attractions along the way – such as <insert hipster café here>.

Savings is not the why, eventually you’ll need to spend your money and that’s a good thing! The why is what your money will give you in return, that aligns to your own goals and values.

So to solve this problem of the millennial fruitcake “should be’s”, let’s look at how you define this thing we call why.

Here’s what you need to do:

1. Investigate yourself

  • Before you can begin to define your why you first need to investigate yourself. It might sound a little strange, but by doing this and asking yourself these questions you’ll create a clear picture of who you really are and what your ideal future looks like. Get a pen and paper and write down your answers…   
  1. What do I want my life to look like in the future?
  2. What do I enjoy, I mean really enjoy?
  3. When do I feel most myself and happiest?
  4. What kinds of people do I want to be around?
  5. What are my core values and how do I want to live according to these?
  6. What do I want my professional life to look like?
  7. What do I want to learn?

2. Define your core goals

  • Now that you’ve written down your answers, it’s time to identify the patterns within them to define your core goals
  • Examples are if you wrote you want to experience new places, learn a new language, and get enjoyment out of travel then your goal might be to go travelling in 1 years’ time
  • Or, if you wrote you want to be around family more often, value your freedom, and want more time for hobbies your goal might be to work more flexible or go part-time.

Identifying these patterns will give you your goals. 

3. Prioritise

  • It’s important at this point to put a reality check in place
  • We only have so much time on this earth and to have goals are great, but if you set too many goals you’re unlikely to make progress  
  • You need to prioritise what is most important to you
  • Analyse what you’ve written down and select your TOP 3 GOALS
  • These are the 3 ‘whys’ you’ll begin with, to plan to shape your future

4. Plan and save

  • Now that you’ve identified your top 3 goals (aka your whys), you can put a plan in place to reach them
  • Give yourself a realistic timeline for each goal and build in the pitstops (small saving milestones) to get you there along the way
  • Ask yourself “does this decision align with my long-term goal?”, by doing this regularly you’ll stay on the highway.

Remember no one else is going to drive to your goals for you. But it’s you that has the control of the wheel. You define your whys. No one else.

The year I got my shit together by creating a budget

The year I got my shit together by creating a budget

Turn the clock back to 2016. When Ed Sheeran was serenading our speakers, cauliflower steaks were all the rage, legends were lost  – Bowie, Prince & Glenn Frey to name a few, and we got Trumped. It was a year of great gains and great losses.

It was a year of uncertainty, of instability and a reflection of my feelings in my own life. I decided to not let these feelings carry through into 2017, but to take control of what I could, starting with money.

I’d never been one to care much about where my money went, or what I did with it. I got my paycheck and very quickly converted it into superfluous purchases – Bento Boxes, Free People clothing, debt payments, plane tickets, weekend trips away, and lots and lots of coffee. Not surprisingly at the end of the month, I had nothing left.

My problem – I had no visibility of where my money was going, and I quite simply didn’t care.

If I wanted to take control I needed a goal, and I needed a plan to get there.

The goal, move to the other side of the world (I’ll do a post about that later)

The plan… I still needed one.

I Googled, I YouTubed, I Podcasted, I asked, searching for that hidden gem of an answer – but time and time again one simple thing popped up that we’ve all heard about before, The Budget.

It’s a very simple task – you write down your income, you deduct your expenses and then you see what you have left to play with.. this is either your Bento Box money, or it’s your savings money (more posts on this later).

It’s something so simple, but so many of us don’t do it. I used this very basic Excel template to build my budget, and still do to this day.

What the budget gave me was a plan to meet my goal, 2019 and 3 years later I’m in London. Granted there are days when I don’t always feel in control, but by having a budget I can plan and build a pathway to financial freedom.

It’s this very simple tool that got me going and that’s opened my eyes to a world where you can take control, you can have choices, and you don’t need much to get there!

What’s my new goal? To spread the word, and help others build their own pathway to financial freedom.

THE LADDER GIRL